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Vision and Aging

Vision & Aging Messages for Social Media

Use these messages in your social media outlets to help increase awareness about common age-related eye diseases and conditions and how people can protect their sight.

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  1. Some changes to your vision are normal as you age, but vision loss and blindness are NOT a normal part of aging. Learn more: www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyestoolkit/pdf/VisionAndHealth_Tagged.pdf
  2. Did you know you are at higher risk for certain eye diseases and conditions as you age? Learn more about these conditions and what you can do to protect your sight at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  3. Dark, leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, or collard greens, can help keep your eyes healthy. Eye health benefits also come from eating fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, and halibut www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyehealthtips.asp
  4. Early detection and treatment of eye disease may prevent vision loss or blindness. Learn what the most common age-related eye diseases and conditions are at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye.
  5. Everyone over age 50 should see an eye care professional for a comprehensive dilated eye exam as part of their routine health care. He or she can tell you how often you need to have one based on your individual risk factors for eye disease. Learn more about comprehensive dilated eye exams at www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyeexam.asp
  6. Not smoking, maintaining normal blood pressure, exercising, eating diet rich in leafy greens and fish and protecting your eyes from the sun are great ways to help reduce your risk of eye disease as you age.
  7. Cataract, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic eye disease, and glaucoma are the most common eye diseases that cause vision loss and blindness among older adults. Learn more about these diseases and how you can protect your sight at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  8. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. Learn more about cataract and how it affects your vision by watching the video at www.nei.nih.gov/videos.
  9. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects sharp, central vision needed for things like reading and driving and is a leading cause of vision loss among older adults. Learn more about AMD at www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts.asp
  10. Did you know the @National Eye Health Education Program has a toolkit professionals can use to educate older adults about eye health in community settings? Visit www.nei.nih.gov/SeeWellToolkit to download it and begin using it in your community.
  11. Medicare helps cover the cost of a comprehensive dilated eye exam for African Americans age 50 and older, Hispanics age 65 and older, people with a family history of glaucoma and people with diabetes. Learn more about this benefit by calling 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or visiting www.medicare.gov
  12. People 50 and older should have regular comprehensive dilated eye exams as part of their routine health care. Schedule an appointment today with your local eye care professional. Learn more at http://1.usa.gov/14lLtii
  13. Are you or someone you know experiencing vision loss? Learn how vision rehabilitation services can help people maintain their independence and quality of life at http://1.usa.gov/X469Jn
  14. Do you work with older adults? The See Well for a Lifetime Toolkit can help you educate older adults in community-based settings about eye health. Download the toolkit at http://1.usa.gov/15zwRvf
  15. Did you know that vision loss is not a normal part of aging? While some changes to vision can occur with age, you don’t have to lose your sight to eye disease. Visit http://1.usa.gov/1cf4Lcm to learn more.
  16. Do you work with older adults with low vision? Vision rehabilitation services can help people maintain their independence and quality of life. Learn more at: http://1.usa.gov/1631MjH
  17. Think back. When was the last time you had a comprehensive dilated eye exam? Last year? Five years ago? Everyone age 50 and older should visit an eye care professional for a comprehensive dilated eye exam as part of their routine health care. Learn more at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  18. Are you or a loved one noticing changes in your vision as you age? Needing glasses to see up close, having trouble adjusting to glare, and distinguishing between colors are common vision changes as people age; vision loss is not. www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  19. Are financial restraints keeping you from getting a comprehensive dilated eye exam? Financial aid may be available. Learn more www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/financialaid.asp
  20. Your eyes have seen so much, but when was the last time they saw your eye care professional? Find an eye care professional near you today. www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/findprofessional.asp
  21. Did you know that a comprehensive dilated eye exam is different from the basic exam or screening you have for glasses or contacts? During this exam, an eye care professional dilates—or widens—the pupils and examines the backs of the eyes for signs of disease or damage. This is important because it can help detect eye diseases in their early stages, before vision loss occurs. Learn more: www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyeexam.asp
  22. Dark, leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, or collard greens, can help keep your eyes healthy. Eye health benefits also come from eating fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, and halibut www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyehealthtips.asp.
  23. Smoking is as bad for your eyes as it is for the rest of your body. Research has linked smoking to an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, cataract, and optic nerve damage, all of which can lead to vision loss.
  24. Did you know that age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic eye disease, glaucoma, and dry eye are the most common eye diseases and conditions to affect people as they age? Learn more at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye.
  25. Ruth has vision loss from age-related macular degeneration but still maintains an active, fulfilling, and independent lifestyle doing the things she loves. Learn more about how vision rehabilitation has helped her: www.nei.nih.gov/lowvision/content/profiles/ruth_l.asp
  26. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common eye condition among people ages 50 and older that affects a part of the retina. In some cases, AMD advances so slowly that little change in vision is noticed. In others, the disease progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in both eyes. For more information, watch this video: www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=t8XSMHGVKGg
  27. Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of vision loss among older adults and affects sharp, central vision. Learn more at www.nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts.asp.
  28. Prolonged exposure to sunlight increases your risk of developing cataract. Always wear sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat when you’re outside. Learn more about cataract by watching this video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5kniE5-Ezg
  29. While anyone can get glaucoma, people at higher risk include African Americans ages 40 and older; people over age 60, especially Mexican Americans; and those with a family history of the disease. People at higher risk should have a comprehensive dilated eye exam every 1 to 2 years. Visit www.nei.nih.gov/glaucoma to learn more.
  30. Having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the most important thing that people can do to take care of their eyes. As people age, they are at risk for developing age-related eye diseases and conditions, but vision loss can be prevented when eye disease is detected and treated early. Learn more at www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyestoolkit/pdf/VisionAndHealth_Tagged.pdf.
  31. Do you work with older adults? The NEHEP See Well for a Lifetime Toolkit is for anyone who works with older adults in community-based settings and needs to educate them about eye health and eye diseases and conditions. Download the toolkit at www.nei.nih.gov/SeeWellToolkit.
  32. As you age, you are at higher risk for developing age-related eye diseases and conditions, such as macular degeneration, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, and dry eye. Learn more about these conditions at: www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  33. Medicare provides a benefit to help people with diabetes and those who are at higher risk for glaucoma to pay for comprehensive dilated eye exams. Take advantage of benefits that may save your sight. Learn more at www.nei.nih.gov/medicare.

Healthy Aging Month Posts (September)

  1. It's Healthy Aging Month and your vision is an important part of your physical well-being. You may start to notice changes in your vision as you age, but vision loss is never normal. See well for a lifetime. Learn more about caring for your eyes at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  2. September is not only "back-to-school" month, it's also Healthy Aging Month. What if you couldn't see the picture your grandkids drew for you at school? Visit an eye care professional and get a comprehensive dilated eye exam to make sure your eyes are healthy and your vision is at its best. www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/findprofessional.asp
  3. September is Healthy Aging Month. Comprehensive dilated eye exams can help reduce the risk of vision loss and blindness by detecting age-related eye diseases early. Schedule your exam today. If you need helping finding a doctor, check out these tips: www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/findprofessional.asp
  4. It’s Healthy Aging Month! Follow these tips to help keep your eyes healthy as you age.
    • Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam.
    • Know your family's eye health history.
    • Maintain a healthy weight and eat a healthy diet.
    • Quit smoking or never start.
    • Wear sunglasses when outdoors.
  5. Toolkits, animations, videos, brochures, social media messages, and more! NEHEP has it all to help you promote eye health during Healthy Aging Month. Visit: www.nei.nih.gov/nehep/programs/visionandaging
  6. Healthy Aging Month is a great time to have a comprehensive dilated eye exam. Schedule yours today!

Twitter

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  1. Losing your vision is NOT a normal part of #aging! Learn how to see well for a lifetime: www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyestoolkit/pdf/VisionAndHealth_Tagged.pdf
  2. Everyone over age 50 should see an #eyecare professional for a dilated eye exam! Watch this video www.nei.nih.gov/videos
  3. Changes in vision as you age are normal, but losing your vision isn’t! Learn more about common eye disease at www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  4. Early detection & treatment of eye disease may prevent vision loss or #blindness! Get a dilated eye exam.
  5. Keep your eyes healthy as you age! For more on #vision and #aging, see @NEHEP: website www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  6. Do you know you are at higher risk for certain eye diseases & conditions as you age? Learn more: www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  7. Age-related macular degeneration (#AMD), cataract, diabetic eye disease & glaucoma are leading causes of blindness among older adults. www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye
  8. Find tips for keeping your eyes healthy and vision at its best at www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyehealthtips.asp
  9. @NEI and @NEHEP have a variety of videos to help you learn about eye exams and common eye diseases and conditions. Watch at www.nei.nih.gov/videos
  10. Medicare helps cover the cost of dilated eye exams for people with diabetes and at risk for glaucoma. Learn more about eligibility at www.nei.nih.gov/medicare.
  11. Everyone ages 50 & older should have a comprehensive dilated eye exam. Learn more from @NEHEP: http://1.usa.gov/14lLtii
  12. Vision rehabilitation can help people with vision loss live active & independent lives. Learn more from @NEHEP: http://1.usa.gov/X469Jn
  13. The @NEHEP “See Well for a Lifetime Toolkit” can help you educate older adults about eye health. Download it today: http://1.usa.gov/15zwRvf
  14. Did you know that vision loss is not a normal part of aging? To learn more from @NEHEP, visit: http://1.usa.gov/1cf4Lcm
  15. A new @NEHEP video can help you learn how vision rehabilitation helps people with low vision maintain their independence. Visit: http://1.usa.gov/1631MjH





Department of Health and Human Services NIH, the National Institutes of Health USA.gov