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Congressional Justification for FY 2010

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National Eye Institute
Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health

FY 2010 Budget:


Organization chart showing the organizational relationship and structure of the offices and divisions of the National Eye Institute. Office of the Director, Director: Dr. Paul A. Sieving; Acting Deputy Director: Dr. Deborah A Carper; Associate Director for Management: David L. Whitmer. Atttached to the Office of the Director is the Division of Intramural Reserach, with Scientific Director: Dr. Sheldon S. Miller; the Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, with Director: Dr. Frederick L. Ferris III; and the Division of Extramural Research, with Director: Lore Anne McNicol.

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Appropriation language

For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Services Act with respect to eye diseases and visual disorders [$688,480,000] $695,789,000 (Department of Health and Human Services Appropriation Act, 2009)

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Amounts Available for Obligation 1/
Source of Funding FY 2008 Actual FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010
PB
1/ Excludes the following amounts for reimbursable activities carried out by this account:
FY 2008 Actual - $15,201,000 FY 2009 Estimate - $17,500,000 FY 2010 Estimate - $17,500,000 Excludes $2,615,200 Actual in FY 2008 for royalties.
Appropriation $678,978,000 $688,480,000 $695,789,000
Recession -11,862,000 0 0
Supplemental 3,548,000 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted appropriation 670,664,000 688,480,000 695,789,000
Real transfer under Director's one-percent transfer authority (GEI) -1,130,000 0 0
Comparative transfer under Director's one-percent transfer authority (GEI) 1,130,000 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority 670,664,000 688,480,000 695,789,000
Unobligated balance, start of year 0 0 0
Unobligated balance, end of year 0 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority 670,664,000 688,480,000 695,789,000
Unobligated balance lapse 0 0 0
Total obligations 670,664,000 688,480,000 695,789,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
(Dollars in Thousands)
Budget Mechanism—Total
MECHANISM FY 2008 Actual FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB Change
Number Amount Number Amount Number Amount Number Amount
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research
Research Grants:
Research Projects:
Noncompeting 780 $290,272 780 $310,015 830 $330,159 50 $20,144
Administrative supplements (67) 10,881 (48) 6,000 (20) 2,500 ((28)) (3,500)
Competing: 279 102,578 258 97,601 225 86,639 (33) (10,962)
Subtotal, RPGs 1,059 403,731 1,038 413,616 1,055 419,298 17 5,682
SBIR/STTR 51 16,229 51 16,256 52 16,420 1 164
Subtotal, RPGs 1,110 419,960 1,089 429,872 1,107 435,718 18 5,846
Research Centers:
Specialized/comprehensive 40 27,066 40 27,472 40 27,472 0 0
Clinical research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biotechnology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Comparative medicine 0 150 0 152 0 152 0 0
Research Centers in Minority Institutions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal, Centers 40 27,216 40 27,624 40 27,624 0 0
Other Research:
Research careers 72 16,808 72 17,060 72 17,060 0 0
Cancer education 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cooperative clinical research 48 50,587 48 51,346 48 51,346 0 0
Biomedical research support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Minority biomedical research support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 20 11,342 20 11,512 20 11,512 0 0
Subtotal, Other Research 140 78,737 140 79,918 140 79,918 0 0
Total Research Grants 1,290 525,913 1,269 537,414 1,287 543,260 18 5,846
Research Training:
Individual awards 60 FTTPs 2,809 90 FTTPs 4,214 90 FTTPs 4,214 0 10
Institutional awards 209 FTTPs 8,599 209 FTTPs 8,685 209 FTTPs 8,685 0 0
Total, Training 269 FTTPs 11,408 90 FTTPs 12,899 299 FTTPs 12,899 0 0
Research & development contracts 52 41,826 48 44,545 47 44,545 (1) 0
(SBIR/STTR) 0 39 (0) (39) (0) (39) (0) (0)
Intramural research 159 FTEs 68,594 164 FTEs 70,172 166 FTEs 71,225 2 FTEs 1,053
Research management and support 71 FTEs 22,923 75 FTEs 23,450 78 FTEs 23,860 3 FTEs 410
Total, NEI 230 FTEs 670,664 239 FTEs 688,480 244 FTEs 695,789 5 FTEs 7,309

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Budget Authority by Program
(Dollars in Thousands)
FY 2006 Actual FY 2007 Actual FY 2008 Actual FY 2008 Comparable FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB Change
FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research
Extramural Research
Detail:
Retinal Disease Research $266534 $263,438 $263,374 $264,572 $271,048 $271,712 2,664
Corneal Diseases, Cataract, and Glaucoma Research 166,543 168,110 168,530 168,859 173,440 175,144 1,704
Sensorimotor Disorders and Rehabilitation Research 144,031 144,556 146,113 145,716 150,370 151,848 1,478
Subtotal, Extramural 577,108 576,104 578,017 579,147 594,858 600,704 5,846
Intramural research 143 67,029 145 67,298 159 68,594 164 70,172 166 71,225 10 7,744 2 1,053
Res. management & support 64 22,161 69 22,584 71 22,923 71 22,923 75 23,450 78 23,860 3 410
TOTAL 207 666,298 214 665,986 230 669,534 230 670,664 239 688,480 244 695,789 5 7,309

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Major Changes in Budget Request

Major changes by budget mechanism and/or budget activity detail are briefly described below. Note that there may be overlap between budget mechanism and activity detail and these highlights will not sum to the total change for the FY 2010 budget request for NEI, which is $7.309 million more than the FY 2009 estimate, for a total of $695.789 million.

Research Project Grants (+$5.846 million; total $435.718 million): The NIH budget policy for Research Project Grants (RPGs) in FY 2010 is to provide 2 percent inflationary increases in noncompeting awards and in the average cost for competing RPGs. NEI will continue to support new investigators while maintaining an adequate number of competing RPGs. NEI will support 1,107 RPGs in FY 2010, an increase of 18 grants and $5.846 million. Noncompeting RPGs will increase by 50 awards and increase by $20.144 million; competing RPGs will decrease by 33 awards and decrease by $10.962 million.

Intramural Research (+$1.053 million; total $71.225 million): Consistent with NIH policy, NEIís Intramural Research funding will increase 1.5 percent. NEI will use this funding to support a new program in computational medicine and biology.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Summary of Changes
FY 2009 estimate $688,480,000
FY 2010 estimated budget authority 695,789,000
Net change 7,309,000
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Summary of Changes (continued)
CHANGES 2009 Current Estimate Base Change from Base
FTEs Budget Authority FTEs Budget Authority
A. Built-in:
1. Intramural research:
a. Annualization of January 2009 pay increase $26,365,000 $315,000
b. January FY 2010 pay increase 26,365,000 395,000
c. Zero less days of pay 26,365,000 0
d. Payment for centrally furnished services 10,933,000 219,000
e. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, and other expenses 32,874,000 542,000
Subtotal 1,471,000
2. Research management and support:
a. Annualization of January 2009 pay increase $10,265,000 $123,000
b. January FY 2010 pay increase 10,265,000 154,000
c. Zero less days of pay 10,265,000 0
d. Payment for centrally furnished services 4,425,000 89,000
e. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, and other expenses 8,760,000 265,000
Subtotal 631,000
Subtotal, Built-in 2,102,000
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Summary of Changes (continued)
CHANGES 2009 Current Estimate Base Change from Base
Number Amount Number Amount
B. Program:
1. Research project grants:
a. Noncompeting 780 $316,015,000 50 $16,644,000
b. Competing 258 97,601,000 (33) (10,962,000)
c. SBIR/STTR 51 16,256,000 1 164,000
Total 1,089 429,872,000 18 5,846,000
2. Research centers 40 27,624,000 0 0
3. Other research 140 79,918,000 0 0
4. Research training 299 12,899,000 0 0
5. Research and development contracts 48 44,545,000 (1) 0
Subtotal, extramural 5,846,000
6. Intramural research 164 FTEs 70,172,000 2 FTEs (418,000)
7. Research management and support 75 FTEs 23,450,000 3 FTEs (221,000)
Subtotal, program 688,480,000 5,207,000
Total changes 239 FTEs 5 FTEs 7,309,000

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Budget Graph information

History of Budget Authority and FTEs:

Full-Time Employees by Fiscal Year

Fiscal Year FTEs
2006 207
2007 214
2008 230
2009 239
2010 244

Funding Levels by Fiscal Year

Fiscal Year Dollars in Millions
2006 666.3
2007 666.7
2008 670.7
2009 688.5
2010 695.8

Distribution by Mechanism:

FY 2010 Budget Mechanism

Mechanism Budget Percent of Budget
Research Project Grants $435,718 64
RM&S $23,860 3
Other Research $79,918 11
R&D Contracts $44,545 6
Intramural Research $71,225 10
Research Training $12,899 2
Research Centers $27,624 4

Change by Selected Mechanisms:

FY 2010 Estimate
Percent Change from FY 2009 Mechanism

Mechanism Percent Change
Research Project Grants 1.4
Research Centers 0
Other Research 0
Research Training 0
R&D Contracts 0
Intramural Research 1.5
Res. Mgmt. & Support 1.7

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Justification narrative

Authorizing Legislation: Section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Service Act, as amended.

FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Omnibus FY 2009 Recovery Act FY 2010 President's Budget FY 2010 +/- 2009 Omnibus
BA $670,664,000 $688,480,000 $174,097,000 $695,789,000 $7,309,000
FTE 230 239 0 244 5

This document provides justification for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 activities of the National Eye Institute (NEI), including HIV/AIDS activities. Details of the FY 2010 HIV/AIDS activities are in the ďOffice of AIDS Research (OAR)Ē Section of the Overview. Details on the Common Fund are located in the Overview, Volume One. Program funds are allocated as follows: Competitive Grants/Cooperative Agreements; Contracts; Direct Federal/Intramural and Other.

In FY 2009, a total of $174,097,000 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds were transferred from the Office of the Director. These funds will be used to support scientific research opportunities that help support the goals of the ARRA. The ARRA allows NIH to execute these funds via any NIH funding mechanism. Funds are available until September 30, 2010. These funds are not included in the FY 2009 Omnibus amounts reflected in this document.

Directorís Overview

The National Eye Instituteís (NEI) mission is to conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of individuals who are visually impaired. These investigations are conducted in hundreds of laboratories and clinics throughout the U.S. and in NEI's intramural research facilities in Bethesda, Maryland.

NEI continues to reinvigorate its intramural research program (IRP) to better leverage new scientific opportunities. The recently established Neurobiology, Neurodegeneration, and Repair Laboratory (N-NRL) integrates basic, pre-clinical, and translational research to develop and test therapeutic interventions in neurodegenerative eye diseases such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa. N-NRL will explore and assess interventions, including gene therapy, small molecules, neurotrophic factors, and cell-based systems, in combination with a variety of treatment delivery technologies.

The immense volume of available genetic data in health and disease requires sophisticated mathematical and statistical methods to help unravel the nature of complex diseases. The IRP will initiate a new program in computational medicine and biology in FY 2010. This program will provide the IRP with increased ability to meld biological information to the medical context of future clinical care based on rapidly evolving knowledge of the genetic basis of disease, including gene expression, protein structure, protein-protein interaction and biological networks. Additionally, the IRP will increase its electrophysiology capabilities by creating a core group dedicated to the clinical and research application of electroretinography, a powerful tool that measures the electrical activity and function of the retina.

NEI established eyeGENETM, a partnership of academic research laboratories from more than 20 universities across the nation that work collaboratively to study the genetic basis of disease. eyeGENETM is designed around the critical research purpose of creating a centralized repository of genetic material and diagnostic information as a national public resource to enable research activity beyond existing limitations. This is done in the context of providing genotype information to participating individuals and their doctors that will help to predict an individualís risk of developing eye disease. The eyeGENETM network will add several additional genotyping tests and testing sites in FY 2010.

NEI has vigorously supported the development of gene transfer techniques for treating blinding genetic eye diseases. These efforts culminated in phase 1 clinical trials to assess the safety of gene transfer in the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe retinal disease. Initial results from these studies were recently published. Investigators found no serious adverse events or systemic toxicities associated with this highly novel investigational therapy. Because phase I trials are designed to evaluate safety, they do not feature the standard statistical and methodological safeguards required to properly evaluate treatment effectiveness. Nonetheless, several of the reported observations suggest that gene transfer may be exerting modest biological effects in some of the treated individuals. Additional follow-up testing of the treated individuals should determine whether these effects are sustained. NEI plans to evaluate the effectiveness of this therapy in a larger phase II clinical trial in 2010. With the safety of this investigational therapy established, the NEI plans to expand its gene transfer portfolio for a number of diseases, including juvenile retinoschisis, an early onset disease that causes another blinding retinal disorder.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the United States, will impose an increasing burden in future years based on demographics. The original AREDS clinical trial, demonstrated that antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements reduced the progression to advanced AMD by 25 percent on average. Building on these landmark findings, AREDS2 is assessing additional supplements (lutein, zeaxanthin, and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids) as a treatment for AMD and cataracts. AREDS2 is also evaluating effects of eliminating beta-carotene and/or reducing zinc in the original AREDS formulation on AMD progression. Recruitment for this large, multicenter clinical trial has been completed. FY 2010 will see continued funding support for AREDS2.

NEI extramural research program implemented an initiative to investigate the role of inflammation in degenerative eye diseases such as AMD, uveitis, and other chronic disorders of the eye. Findings indicated that some forms of the toll-like receptor 3 protein may convey protection, thus opening possibilities for developing a pharmacologic therapy for this devastating eye disease. This finding will spur further expansion of the existing initiative in FY 2010 to look for specific viruses that activate the toll-like receptor 3 gene and other immune receptors that might exert a similar pathology. NEI also seeks to expand our knowledge of how the inflammatory process is controlled using the eye as a model system. This knowledge will be pivotal to the development of new diagnostic and intervention strategies to halt and reverse the progression of degenerative eye diseases.

Early detection of diabetic eye disease is critical to prompt, sight-saving treatment. Currently there is a need for low-cost screening devices to improve monitoring and detection efforts in insulin-dependent patients. In FY 2009 NEI issued a Request for Application (RFA) to develop screening devices through its Small Business Innovation Research program. Grants from this RFA will be funded and supported in FY 2010.

NEI funds basic research on cell biology, development and the regulation of blood vessel growth where findings could have relevance to our understanding and treatment of cancer. NEI also supports a phase III clinical trial on the treatment of retinoblastoma, a cancerous, blinding and potentially fatal eye disease. Consistent with the FY 2010 NIH priority to expand cancer research funding, NEI will increase its FY 2010 commitment to this portion of the portfolio by 4.4 percent.

Overall Budget Policy

NEI will continue to support new investigators and to maintain an adequate number of competing RPGs. NEI will provide a 2 percent inflationary increase for non-competing and competing grants. The first priority will continue to be funding the highest quality investigator-initiated research applications, determined by the scientific and technical merit of the application as evaluated through the peer review system. Intramural Research and Research Management and Support will receive modest increases to help offset the cost of pay and other increases.

Program Descriptions and Accomplishments

Retinal Diseases Research:

The light-sensitive retina of the eye is susceptible to many sight-threatening conditions including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, retinitis pigmentosa, Usher's syndrome, ocular albinism, retinal detachment, uveitis (inflammation), and eye cancer. The goals of this program area are to understand the disease mechanisms that cause vision loss and to develop improved methods of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. To meet these goals, NEI supports research on the cell biology, physiology, and immunology of the retina and on the role of gene expression, gene regulation, and the environment in retinal health and disease.

Recent accomplishments include the publication of promising results from a phase I clinical trial to assess the safety of gene transfer in treating Leber congenital amaurosis, a severe retinal disease. There were no serious adverse events or systemic toxicities associated with this highly novel investigational therapy.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2010 budget estimate for these activities is $273.712 million, an increase of $2.664 million or 1.0 percent over the FY 2009 estimate. FY 2010 program plans will focus on an acceleration of research on the genetic and environmental basis for AMD, including the role of possible immunological factors. This will include an expansion of genome wide association studies and related efforts in bioinformatics. NEI will support projects that address the possible restoration of vision in retinal degenerative diseases by building on recent advances in gene transfer, cell transplantation and precursor cell biology. Research will continue in efforts to control abnormal new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) in a number of eye diseases, and will include the conduct of clinical trials in this area. Program plans also include the continuation of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), a multi-center study to evaluate the use of additional oral supplements for the treatment of AMD and cataract. NEI also plans to continue collaborating with the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute on the follow-up ocular component of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study.

Portrait of a Program: Gene Transfer Therapy for Childhood-Onset Blindness

FY 2009 Level: $1.900 million
FY 2010 Level: $2.000 million
Change: $0.100 million

In FY 2008, NEI launched a phase I clinical trial to assess the safety of gene transfer in treating people with a severe form of childhood blindness called Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This therapy is intended to restore lost vision by transferring a functional copy of the mutant, dysfunctional gene which causes the disease. Results from these trials were recently published. Investigators found no serious adverse events or systemic toxicities associated with this highly novel investigational therapy. The trials will continue to evaluate the safety of escalated doses and retreatment. It is anticipated that in FY 2010 the NEI will expand to a phase II clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment in a larger group of patients. NEI also plans to further expand its gene transfer portfolio for a number of diseases, including juvenile retinoschisis, an early onset disease that causes another blinding retinal disorder.

Portrait of a Program: Role of Inflammation in Age Related Macular Degeneration

FY 2009 Level: $2.300 million
FY 2010 Level: $2.500 million
Change $0.200 million

Recognition that inflammation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has led to a major paradigm shift in our understanding of this disease. Investigators now hypothesize that the underlying mechanism that leads to AMD is immune driven, perhaps sharing some of the characteristics of atherosclerosis and other degenerative disorders. A recently published study reports on an association between the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) gene, which encodes a viral sensor that activates immune responses, and advanced AMD. This finding will spur additional investigations in FY 2010 to look for associations with other genes in the immune pathway and to test for the presence of viruses in patients with AMD that spur activation of the TLR3 gene.

Corneal Diseases, Cataract, and Glaucoma Research:

Corneal diseases, cataract, and glaucoma are among the most prevalent disorders of the eye. Corneal injuries, infections, and diseases can be extremely painful, requiring immediate medical attention. NEI grantees are exploring how infectious, inflammatory, and immunological processes affect the cornea, and how the cornea heals following a wound. The cornea, tear film, eyelids, and conjunctiva form a highly-integrated biological system.

By 2020 researchers estimate that about 40 million Americans will be affected by cataracts1. The economic burden of cataract will only worsen as the American population ages. NEI cataract research seeks to understand the physiological basis of lens transparency at the cellular and molecular levels and seeks strategies to prevent cataract formation and progression.

Approximately 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma and the prevalence of the disease will rise to a projected 3 million by 20202. Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in African Americans. Glaucoma research aims to understand the complex genetic and biological factors that cause the disease and to develop treatments that protect optic nerves from the damage that leads to vision loss.

The recently published Cornea Donor Study (CDS) found that corneal transplants using tissue from older donors have similar rates of survival to those using tissue from younger donors. The CDS study gives eye banks, transplant surgeons and patients confidence in the use of older donor tissue. This finding should also help eye banks keep pace with the increasing demand for corneal tissue.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2010 budget estimate for these activities is $175.144 million, an increase of $1.704 million or 1.0 percent over the FY 2009 estimate. FY 2010 program plans include following up on a recent finding that certain receptors that bind to vascular endothelial growth factor may play an important role in maintaining the normal transparency of the cornea. NEI expects to fund new projects to identify therapeutic approaches to limit and/or reduce corneal pain. Projects will be funded to examine the possible contribution of defects in the gap junctions in the development of cataracts. Genome wide association studies and related bioinformatics efforts will be launched to explore further the role of genetics and the environment on the development of glaucoma and to understand better the differential response of individuals to glaucoma medications. NEI will expand its collaboration in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility Study with the National Institute on Aging and several other institutes. NEI will also fund the follow-up ocular component of this study, which is investigating the contribution of candidate genes and the environment in diseases that are common in old age.

Sensorimotor Disorders and Rehabilitation Research:

Strabismus (misalignment of the eyes) and amblyopia (commonly known as "lazy eye") occur during development and affect 2-4 percent of the U.S. population34. Program goals center on gaining a better understanding of the development of the visual system in children at high risk for these conditions, and of the neuromuscular control of gaze.

Refractive errors, such as nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia) and astigmatism are the most common, correctable visual disorders. A major goal of this program is to prevent refractive error by discovering the biochemical pathways that govern eye growth and uncovering the risk factors associated with refractive errors.

Much of the cerebral cortex is devoted to processing the visual information that floods our eyes. Vision scientists seek to understand how the brain processes visual information, how neural activity is related to visual perception, and how the visual system interacts with cognitive and motor systems.

Three million Americans now have low vision, a term used to describe chronic visual conditions that are not correctable by eye glasses or contact lenses5. The NEI supports rehabilitation research on improving the quality of life of persons with visual impairments by helping them maximize the use of remaining vision and by devising improved aids and strategies to assist those without useful vision.

Recent accomplishments include the discovery that astrocytes, a class of glial cells, previously thought to act solely as a support network for nerve cells and circuits, also respond to visual stimuli in a manner similar to neuronal cells. Investigators also developed a novel method to trace all the pre-synaptic connections of a single nerve cell in living tissue within the nervous system, revealing how a single nerve cell interacts in a larger circuit.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2010 budget estimate for these activities is $151.848 million, an increase of $1.478 million or 1.0 percent over the FY 2009 estimate. FY2010 program plans include pursuing the research finding of several genes involved in Leberís Hereditary Optic Neuropathy, a genetic disease that frequently results in a substantial loss of central vision. Research will also pursue new findings about how the activity of certain brain cells allows us to perceive a stable view of our surroundings despite constant head and eye movements, as highlighted in NEIís strategic plan.

Intramural Research:

The program conducts vision research in its laboratories and clinic located on the NIH campus in Bethesda and other facilities in Rockville, Maryland. Program activities include: clinical studies concerned with the cause, prevention, and treatment of major eye diseases and vision disorders; basic research on cellular and molecular mechanisms of eye development, including the expression and function of genes within the eye; research in immunology and infectious diseases of the eye; and, developing a better understanding of our critical ability to guide movements under sensory control. Recent accomplishments include the discovery of gene alterations leading to retinal disease; a greater understanding of photoreceptor cell differentiation; and the discovery of a neuroprotective agent as a potential new therapeutic in retinal degenerative diseases.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $71.225 million, an increase of $1.053 million or 1.5 percent over the FY 2009 estimate. In FY 2010, NEI plans continued recruitment for the recently established Laboratory of Neurobiology, Neurodegeneration and Repair to integrate basic, pre-clinical, and translation research in developing and testing therapeutic interventions in neurodegenerative eye diseases. NEI will also enhance the Ophthalmic Genetics and Visual Function Branch and expand the eyeGENETM network to facilitate research on the genetic causes of ocular diseases.

Research Management and Support:

Research Management and Support (RMS) sustains, guides, and monitors the extramural and intramural research programs. Included in these funds are the support necessary for personnel to carry out leadership and management functions, human resource support, training, travel, purchasing, facilities, budget, planning, information technology, and extramural grant award and management. NEI currently oversees more than 1,300 grants and contracts, including research project grants, core center grants, research career development awards, cooperative clinical research agreements, and research and development contracts.

The management plans for FY 2010 include the continued prudent use of RMS funds while implementing strategic change through continuous improvement, business process reengineering, and other change strategies to meet NEI goals. For example, as part of its strategic planning process, NEI scientific programs undergo regular portfolio review at its National Advisory Eye Council meetings. NEI is participating in a variety of trans-NIH objectives such as using Knowledge Management to implement a transparent coding and disease reporting system and embracing the electronic submission of grant applications to replace previous paper applications. NEI will develop a Risk Management Program that will align with that of the NIH to standardize the risk management process and implement this risk management methodology, approach, tools, and procedures.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2010 budget estimate for these activities is $23.860 million, an increase of $410 thousand or 1.8 percent over the FY 2009 estimate. This increase reflects NIH policy and will be used to help offset the cost of pay and other increases.

Common Fund:

The NEI is the lead institute for the Nanomedicine Initiative supported through the NIH Common Fund.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Budget Authority by Object
Total compensable workyears FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB Increase or Decrease
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research
Full-time employment 239 244 5
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours 0 0 0
Average ES salary $158,000 $161,200 $3,200
Average GM/GS grade 12.2 12.2 0.0
Average GM/GS salary $98,900 $100,900 $2,000
Average salary, grade established by act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) $78,500 $80,100 $1,600
Average salary of ungraded positions $130,000 $132,600 $2,600
Budget Authority by Object
(continued)
OBJECT CLASSES FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB Increase or Decrease
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research
Personnel Compensation:
11.1 Full-time permanent $15,216,000 $16,008,000 $792,000
11.3 Other than full-time permanent 9,644,000 10,062,000 418,000
11.5 Other personnel compensation 959,000 1,004,000 45,000
11.7 Military personnel 341,000 354,000 13,000
11.8 Special personnel services payments 3,304,000 3,434,000 130,000
Total, Personnel Compensation 29,464,000 30,862000 1,398,000
12.0 Personnel benefits 6,922,000 7,253,000 331,000
12.2 Military personnel benefits 244,000 254,000 10,000
13.0 Benefits for former personnel 0 0 0
Subtotal, Pay Costs 36,630,000 38,369,000 1,739,000
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons 931,000 910,000 (21,000)
22.0 Transportation of things 76,000 74,000 (2,000)
23.1 Rental payments to GSA 1,000 1,000 0
23.2 Rental payments to others 9,000 9,000 0
23.3 Communications, utilities and miscellaneous charges 701,000 667,000 (34,000)
24.0 Printing and reproduction 156,000 150,000 (6,000)
25.1 Consulting services 320,000 315,000 (5,000)
25.2 Other services 7,376,000 7,222,000 (154,000)
25.3 Purchase of goods and services from government accounts 56,497,000 56,665,000 168,000
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities 1,153,000 1,115,000 (38,000)
25.5 Research and development contracts 23,376,000 23,355,000 (21,000)
25.6 Medical care 239,000 237,000 (2,000)
25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment 2,956,000 2,900,000 (56,000)
25.8 Subsistence and support of persons 0 0 0
25.0 Subtotal, Other Contractual Services 91,917,000 91,809,000 (108,000)
26.0 Supplies and materials 4,444,000 4,391,000 (53,000)
31.0 Equipment 3,299,000 3,247,000 (52,000)
32.0 Land and structures 0 0 0
33.0 Investments and loans 0 0 0
41.0 Grants, subsidies and contributions 550,313,000 556,159,000 5,846,000
42.0 Insurance claims and indemnities 0 0 0
43.0 Interest and dividends 3,000 3,000 0
44.0 Refunds 0 0 0
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs 651,850,000 657,420,000 5,570,000
Total Budget Authority by Object 688,480,000 695,789,000 7,309,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Salaries and Expenses
OBJECT CLASSES FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB Increase or Decrease
Personnel Compensation:
Full-time permanent (11.1) $15,216,000 $16,008,000 $792,000
Other than full-time permanent (11.3) 9,644,000 10,062,000 418,000
Other personnel compensation (11.5) 959,000 1,004,000 45,000
Military personnel (11.7) 142,000 146,000 4,000
Special personnel services payments (11.8) 341,000 354,000 13,000
Total Personnel Compensation (11.9) 29,464,000 30,862,000 1,398,000
Civilian personnel benefits (12.1) 6,922,000 7,253,000 331,000
Military personnel benefits (12.2) 244,000 254,000 10,000
Benefits to former personnel (13.0) 0 0 0
Subtotal, Pay Costs 36,630,000 38,369,000 1,739,000
Travel (21.0) 931,000 910,000 (21,000)
Transportation of things (22.0) 76,000 74,000 (2,000)
Rental payments to others (23.2) 9,000 9,000 0
Communications, utilities and miscellaneous charges (23.3) 701,000 667,000 (34,000)
Printing and reproduction (24.0) 156,000 150,000 (6,000)
Other Contractual Services:
Advisory and assistance services (25.1) 320,000 315,000 (5,000)
Other services (25.2) 7,376,000 7,222,000 (154,000)
Purchases from government accounts (25.3) 37,157,000 37,325,000 168,000
Operation and maintenance of facilities (25.4) 1,153,000 1,115,000 (38,000)
Operation and maintenance of equipment (25.7) 2,956,000 2,900,000 (56,000)
Subsistence and support of persons (25.8) 0 0 0
Subtotal Other Contractual Services 48,962,000 48,877,000 (85,000)
Supplies and materials (26.0) 4,429,000 4,376,000 (53,000)
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs 55,264,000 55,063,000 (201,000)
Total, Administrative Costs 91,894,000 93,432,000 1,538,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Authorizing Legislation
PHS Act/Other Citation U.S. Code Citation 2009 Amount Authorized FY 2009 Estimate 2010 Amount Authorized FY 2010 PB
Research and Investigation Section 301 42§241 Indefinite Combined $688,480,000 Indefinite Combined $695,789,000
National Eye Institute Section 402(a) 42§281 Indefinite Indefinite
Total, Budget Authority 688,480 695,789,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Appropriations History
Fiscal Year Budget Estimate to Congress House Allowance Senate Allowance Appropriation 1/
1/ Reflects enacted supplementals, rescissions, and reappropriations.
2/ Excludes funds for HIV/AIDS research activities consolidated in the NIH Office of AIDS Research.
2001 462,776,000 2/ 514,673,000 516,605,000 510,611,000
Rescission (153,000)
2002 571,126,000 2/ 566,725,000 614,000,000 581,366,000
Rescission (653,000)
2003 625,666,000 625,666,000 637,290,000 637,290,000
Rescission (4,142,000)
2004 652,738,000 648,299,000 657,199,000 657,199,000
Rescission (4,147,000)
2005 671,578,000 671,578,000 680,300,000 674,578,000
Rescission (5,508,000)
2006 673,491,000 673,491,000 693,559,000 673,491,000
Rescission (6,735,000)
2007 661,358,000 661,358,000 666,898,000 667,166,000
Rescission 0
2008 667,820,000 677,039,000 681,962,000 678,978,000
Rescission (11,862,000)
Supplemental 3,548,000
2009 667,764,000 690,721,000 687,346,000 688,480,000
Rescission 0
2010 695,789,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Details of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)
OFFICE/DIVISION FY 2008 Actual FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB
Includes FTEs that are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research
Office of the Director 76 79 80
Division of Intramural Research 118 122 124
Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications 10 10 10
Division of Extramural Research 26 28 30
Total 230 239 244
FTEs supported by funds from Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (0) (0) (0)
Details of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)
(continued)
FISCAL YEAR Average GM/GS Grade
2006 12.5
2007 12.2
2008 12.0
2009 12.2
2010 12.2

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Eye Institute
Details of Positions
GRADE FY 2008 Actual FY 2009 Estimate FY 2010 PB
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research.
Total, ES Positions 2 1 1
Total, ES Salary $322,641 $158,000 $161,200
GM/GS-15 32 34 34
GM/GS-14 15 17 18
GM/GS-13 28 29 31
GS-12 30 31 33
GS-11 30 31 31
GS-10 0 0 0
GS-9 13 13 13
GS-8 7 7 7
GS-7 4 4 4
GS-6 1 1 1
GS-5 0 0 0
GS-4 2 2 2
GS-3 0 0 0
GS-2 1 0 0
GS-1 0 0 0
Subtotal 163 169 174
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207):
Assistant Surgeon General 0 0 0
Director Grade 0 0 0
Senior Grade 1 1 1
Full Grade 2 2 2
Senior Assistant Grade 0 0 0
Assistant Grade 0 0 0
Subtotal 3 3 3
Ungraded 87 89 89
Total permanent positions 165 172 173
Total positions, end of year 255 264 269
Total full-time equivalent (FTE) employment, end of year 230 239 244
Average ES salary $161,321 $158,000 $161,200
Average GM/GS grade 12.0 12.2 12.2
Average GM/GS salary $94,428 $98,900 $100,900

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