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Home » For Parents, Teachers and Coaches » Finding the Right Eye Protection
For Parents, Teachers and Coaches. Photo provided courtesy of Liberty Sport.

Finding the Right Eye Protection

The following chart summarizes recommended eye protection for a variety of sports. Visit your eye care professional or local sporting goods store to learn more about the most appropriate type of protective eyewear for your child and to ensure proper fit.

Sport Eye Protection
Badminton Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Baseball Polycarbonate face guard or other certified safe protection attached to the helmet for batting and base running; sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses for fielding
Basketball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Bicycling (LER)* Sturdy street-wear frames with polycarbonate or CR-39 lenses
Boxing None is available
Fencing Full-face cage
Field Hockey (both sexes) Goalie: full-face mask; all others: sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Football Polycarbonate shield on helmet
Full-contact martial arts Not allowed
Handball** Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Ice Hockey Helmet and full-face protection
Lacrosse (male) Helmet and full-face protection required
Lacrosse (female) Should at least wear sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses and have option to wear helmet and full-face protection
Racquetball** Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Soccer Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Softball Polycarbonate face guard on a helmet for batting and base running; sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses for fielding
Squash** Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Street hockey Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses; goalie: full face cage
Swimming and pool sports Swim goggles recommended
Tennis: doubles Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Tennis: singles Sturdy street-wear frames with polycarbonate lenses
Track and field (LER)* Sturdy street-wear frames with polycarbonate or CR-39 lenses
Water polo Swim goggles with polycarbonate lenses
Wrestling None is available
* For sports in which face masks or helmets with eye protection are worn, functionally one-eyed athletes and those with previous eye trauma or surgery for whom their ophthalmologists recommend eye protection must also wear sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses to ensure protection.
LER indicates low eye risk.
Goggles without lenses are not effective.
A street hockey ball can penetrate into a molded goalie mask and injure an eye.
Source: Reproduced with permission from Pediatrics Vol. 113 (3), Pages 619-622, Copyright 2004 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Photo provided courtesy of Liberty Sport.



Department of Health and Human Services NIH, the National Institutes of Health USA.gov