Macular Pucker

A macular pucker is scar tissue that forms on the eye’s macula, located in the center of the eye’s light-sensitive tissue called the retina. The macula provides sharp, central vision. A macular pucker can cause blurred and distorted central vision.

Macular Pucker

Most of the eye’s interior is filled with vitreous, a gel-like substance that fills about 80 percent of the eye and helps it maintain a round shape. The vitreous contains millions of fine fibers that are attached to the surface of the retina. As we age, the vitreous slowly shrinks and pulls away from the retinal surface. This is called a vitreous detachment, and is normal. In most cases, there are no adverse effects, except for a small increase in floaters, which are little “cobwebs” or specks that seem to float about in your field of vision.