November 5, 2019
Zebrafish facility

Albert Pan (left), an associate professor at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute, and Manxiu 'Michelle' Ma, a research associate in the Pan lab, were part of a team of scientists who worked with zebrafish to discover that genes linked to autism spectrum disorder and other brain abnormalities may be playing a role in people who cannot control their eye movements.

Researchers studying zebrafish have found that genes linked to autism spectrum disorder and other developmental brain abnormalities may be playing a role in people who cannot control their eye movements.

The findings, to publish this week in The Journal of Neuroscience — the official journal of the nearly 40,000-member Society for Neuroscience — underscore the importance of the Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule-Like 1 gene in the development of eye movements.