Think you know all there is to know about the eyes? Take this quiz to test your knowledge.

Doctor and patient during an eye exam

Which of these is a real thing an eye doctor might do to treat an eye disease?

Sadly, no. Sunglasses can help prevent cataracts, but they don’t treat eye diseases. There’s actually a procedure called a vitrectomy where an eye doctor sucks the fluid out of your eye with a tiny vacuum. No joke! It can treat eye conditions like retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy.
No. That would be alarming! There’s actually a procedure called a vitrectomy where an eye doctor sucks the fluid out of your eye with a tiny vacuum. No joke! It can treat eye conditions like retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy.
It’s true. This procedure, called a vitrectomy, can treat retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

Woman laughing with her eyes closed

How many times do you blink in a day?

Nope — way more than that. Blinking helps keep your eyes from getting dry. If you only blinked 3,000 times a day, you’d have some very dry eyeballs. The average person blinks 15 to 20 times every minute, or almost 30,000 times a day.
You got it! The average person blinks 15 to 20 times every minute, or almost 30,000 times a day.
Whoa. That would be a little too blinky. The average person blinks 15 to 20 times every minute, or almost 30,000 times a day.

Woman putting on mascara as she looks in the mirror

What's the point of eyelashes?

Have you ever tried to remove a contact? They do a pretty good job sticking to your eye all by themselves. Eyelashes help keep stuff out of your eyes — so next time you get something in your eye, you’ll know who to blame.
It’s true! Eyelashes help keep stuff out of your eyes — so next time you get something in your eye, you’ll know who to blame.
Well, sure. But that’s just a bonus! Eyelashes help keep stuff out of your eyes — so next time you get something in your eye, you’ll know who to blame.

Man and woman standing outside a building putting on sunglasses 

What do you call the cells in your eyes that respond to light?

You got it! Rods are photoreceptors (light-sensitive cells) that help you see at night, and cones are photoreceptors that help you see colors.
No. But now’s a good time to remind you that when you play with balls and sticks, you need protective eyewear! The answer is actually rods and cones. Rods are photoreceptors (light-sensitive cells) that help you see at night, and cones are photoreceptors that help you see colors.
No. (Maybe in Britain.) It’s actually rods and cones. Rods are photoreceptors (light-sensitive cells) that help you see at night, and cones are photoreceptors that help you see colors.

Close-up of a brown pair of eyes

What’s nystagmus?

Nope. That would be Theia, the Greek goddess of sight. Nystagmus means quick eye movements you can’t control— usually side to side, but sometimes up and down, or in circles.
Yep! Nystagmus means quick eye movements that you can’t control — usually side to side, but sometimes up and down, or in circles.
Lovely! But no. Nystagmus means quick eye movements you can’t control — usually side to side, but sometimes up and down, or in circles.

Woman covering up one eye during an eye eam

What is your blind spot?

Also that! But this is an eye quiz, folks. Your blind spot is the small part of your visual field where you can’t see anything. Your retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of your eye) has a small area with no light-sensitive cells, where the optic nerve attaches. And that creates a small “blind spot” in your vision.
Okay that too! But save that chat for a heart-to-heart with your best friend — we’re here to talk about eyeballs. Your blind spot is the small part of your visual field where you can’t see anything. Your retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of your eye) has a small area with no light-sensitive cells, where the optic nerve attaches. And that creates a small “blind spot” in your vision.
Bingo! Your retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of your eye) has a small area with no light-sensitive cells, where the optic nerve attaches. And that creates a small “blind spot” in your vision.

Man sitting and reading a magazine in a clinic waiting room underneath a large diagram of an eye that hangs on the wall

Which of these is an actual part of the eye?

Indeed. But so are all the others! And in case you’re wondering, the canal of Schlemm is a set of small tubes that helps fluid drain out of your eye.
Yes. It’s real. But so are all the others! And FYI, the lacrimal caruncle is the little pink triangle at the inner corner of your eye.
It is. But so are all the others! And to save you the google search, the trabecular meshwork is spongy tissue that helps fluid drain out of your eye through — wait for it — the canal of Schlemm!
Yep. No joke. But so are all the others! And just so you know, the zonule of Zinn is a little band of fibers that attaches a muscle to your eye’s lens (clear inner part of the eye that helps the eye focus).
Yep. We swear, these are all real. Happy googling!
Last updated: July 28, 2020